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Sarah Palin: The Gloria Steinem of the New Millenium

I’m what you call a Sarah Palin agnostic.

I like her personally, and defended her through out the election from liberal-media vitriol and the incompetence of the McCain campaign. I also think a lot of the current coverage is an excuse for the media to claim Republicans have no ideas because if they’re talking aboot Palin or assclowns like Glen Beck, they ignoring cats like Paul Ryan and Tom Price who have ideas.

And I agree with Pat Buchanan that Todd should hold Levi Johnson’s head underwater until the thrashing stops.

That said, I never thought she was running in 2012, and while I’ve never had anyone systematically destroy my family before, quitting as Governor – to me at least – shows she’s not ready for prime time and we should stop pretending that she is.

I am, however, fascinated by the outrage open-minded and tolerant liberal progressives have just by reading the words “Sarah Palin,” so when I saw an article called “Sarah Palin: Redefining Feminism,” I feel the need to bring it to everyone’s attention for no other reason than to piss off a lot of people. So sayeth the author…

What is really at the heart of the unrelenting vitriol and paranoia came to light rather innocuously in the celebrity style, soft-focus Oprah interview. In fact, the offending comment was so casually and organically delivered, that as far as I can tell, the chattering class, normally so quick to pounce on the slightest hint of mommy-war fodder, especially from someone as reviled by the left as Sarah Palin, did not picked up on the comment. Near the end of the interview, in a gracious moment of praise and admiration for her host, Sarah recalled the days when she watched the Oprah Show more regularly, “back when I was a stay-at-home mom in the 90s”. That’s right, back when I was a stay-at-home-mom. When have we ever heard those words come out of the mouth of a female politician, much less one who is a possible contender for the highest office in the land?

In that one innocent phrase, Sarah did more than endear herself to Oprah or to stay-at-home-moms across the country; together with her husband Todd, Sarah Palin, is radically, and perhaps irrevocably redefining feminism. Sarah’s biography is the very public proof of what many women have already confirmed in their own lives: that success and female empowerment are not necessarily incompatible with early marriage, unplanned pregnancies, stay-at-home motherhood, or a large family.

In comparison, to Sarah’s modern “take it as it comes” approach to life, feminist notions of success are rather rigid. They encourage, if not demand, that young women leave their stem families to pursue east-coast elite educations, urban experiences (goodbye pot roasts and Moose stew), six-figure salaries, and a respectable limit when it comes to children (less trouble, smaller carbon footprint!). Sarah’s family life, as colorful as it is, is an affirmation of the virtues of an all-American small town life; of big, close-knit Christian families and proximity to a supportive extended family. Sarah’s success is proof that conservatism and traditional family values are not incompatible with a modern woman’s dreams and ambitions and that with the blessing of a good partner like Todd, it may even be a superior, much more satisfying path to achieving it.

Read the whole article to forward it to any open minded and tolerent liberal progressives you know, just to watch their heads explode.

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2 responses to “Sarah Palin: The Gloria Steinem of the New Millenium

  1. Melissa ⋅

    That was very rude on your part, not to mention incredibly childish.

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